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Cô Phù Thủy Nhỏ Phần 2 - Sabrina The Teenage Witch - Season 2
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Cô Phù Thủy Nhỏ Phần 2 – Sabrina The Teenage Witch – Season 2

Diễn Viên : Nate Richert,Caroline Rhea,Beth Broderick,Melissa Joan Hart, …
Đạo Diễn : Gary Halvorson, Peter Baldwin, David Trainer, Kenneth R. Koch
Thời Lượng:26 tập
Thể Loại: Phim Hài Hước, Phim khoa học viễn tưởng, Phim phiêu lưu
Quốc Gia: Mỹ – Châu Âu
Sản Xuất Năm : 1998
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Thông tin Phim : Phim.VinaGiaitri.Net –

Mười sáu tuối và biết tin mình là một phù thủy, Sabrina bắt đầu bước vào một thế giới khác. Một phù thủy tập sự trong một thế giới tuổi teen nhiều điều thú vị. Credit: ITFriend

Tag: Beth Broderick,Caroline Rhea,Nate Richert,Melissa Joan Hart,Cô phù thủy nhỏ

“Sabrina” was based on an Archie Comics series that achieved moderate popularity in the 1970s. The character was introduced in a 1962 issue of Archie’s Mad House and by the early ’70s, she was treated to her own line of comic books and was already a mainstay of Saturday morning television, appearing in Flimation cartoon series like “The Archie Comedy Hour”, “Sabrina and the Groovie Goolies”, and a self-titled show all her own. TGIF viewers weren’t very likely to have connected Melissa Joan Hart’s very ’90s protagonist with Sabrina’s print and Jane Webb-voiced animated incarnations of the past. They’d have been more likely to consider Sabrina a teenaged twist on “Bewitched”, the 1960s-70s sitcom about a nose-twitching witch and her mortal husband.

That isn’t a far off comparison, as lighthearted situations, magic for laughs, and fantastic powers in an ordinary world are all in high supply for “Sabrina” as they were for “Bewitched.” The daughter of a mortal mother and a warlock father, the half-witch Sabrina Spellman (Hart) seems like a pretty ordinary teenager to most people. But at her Massachusetts home, where she lives with her two witch aunts — fun and music-loving Hilda (Caroline Rhea) and the orderly, scientific Zelda (Beth Broderick) — and a warlock-turned-talking cat Salem (voiced by writer-producer Nick Bakay), Sabrina’s secret is safe. All sorts of imaginative magic spells flow in and outside the Spellman household, though Sabrina understandably must keep her powers confidential in the Mortal Realm, even from her boyfriend Harvey (Nate Richert) and especially from her nemesis, the snobby cheerleader Libby (Jenna Leigh Green, Broadway’s Wicked).

Over the course of its seven seasons on the air, “Sabrina” underwent more cast changes than even longer-running sitcoms ever do; only Sabrina and her sarcastic feline would appear in all of the series’ 163 half-hour installments. Personnel shake-ups began as early as Season 2. Entering the fray in 1997-98 are TV veteran Martin Mull as Vice Principal Willard Kraft, who is quick to punish and not shy about playing favorites, and Lindsay Sloane as Valerie, an insecure new girl who becomes Sabrina’s closest female friend. Easily showing up most frequently among actors not given opening credits status, Mary Gross (who spent four years on “Saturday Night Live” during the early ’80s) is also added as Sabrina’s timid algebra teacher Mrs. Quick. The three new cast members essentially replace best friend Jenny (Michelle Beaudoin) and biology teacher Mr. Gene Pool (“Freaks and Geeks” creator Paul Feig) that Sabrina had in Season 1.

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The single greatest overriding thread of sophomore season “Sabrina” involves the titular teen’s year-long efforts to earn her witch’s license. To that end, the colorfully-clad Quizmaster (Alimi Ballard, “Numb3rs”) shows up regularly without warning to test Sabrina on her knowledge of spells and values in using them. Quite often, though, Sabrina’s life is more similar to that of a normal teenaged American girl of the late-20th century. She spends a lot of time hanging out with the sideburned, cartilage-pierced football reserve Harvey and the desperate-to-be-cool Valerie at Westbridge High School and at local pizza joint The Slicery. There are struggles at home over responsibilities. Her principles drive her to clash with Mr. Kraft and his favored Libby. Between training for her witch’s license and the typically full slate of a high school student, Sabrina finds herself pulled in a number of directions from the season’s start. The feeling factors strongly in her and Harvey’s decision to date other people, though one never really doubts their relationship will survive the genial break.

“Sabrina” clearly adheres to a formula, but it is not one enforced strictly enough to grow tiresome. A typical episode involves a magical dilemma (often a spell that backfires or just goes wrong), which Sabrina must overcome and unquestionably learn from. There are plenty of variations and alterations to that general premise for the show to remain fresh in Season 2. Even a humdrum “A” plot is usually spiced up with a reliable “B” storyline, frequently centering on Sabrina’s quirky aunts. There is no shortage of puns. Elements of the parallel Other Realm show large amounts of inspiration and an effective sense of humor. And magical spells are applied in amusing, interesting ways.

Keeping things lively in Sabrina’s two worlds is a universally talented cast. As a family-friendly TV show, “Sabrina” is part of a class where there inevitably tends to be some weak links among the regular actors, be they adults that are outshined by charismatic kids, cute kids that quickly grow out of their photogenic stage, or just generally unpolished, inexperienced young cast members. The four leading teens are played by actors who were 19-21 years of age in Season 2 and each is confident in handling comedic material, especially Hart, who’s given the most opportunities to shine.

The adult actors bring even more to the table, complementing their younger cast mates by retaining some commonly adolescent shortcomings. Mull is quite hilarious as the unfair, unhip, and somewhat immature high school authority figure, while Rhea excels as the sarcastic, superficial big-sister like aunt. In voice alone, Bakay makes the lazy, opportunistic Salem an endearing cad of a cat, even when the animatronic puppetry might otherwise introduce doubt. One can’t overlook those in less flashy roles, however, as the maternal Broderick, amusingly-plagued Ballard, and helplessly shy recurring Gross all generate laughs and add to the mix.

If the laugh track is to be trusted, the jokes of “Sabrina” are designed to elicit chuckles more than hearty guffaws. An honest move, the moderate audience response probably contributes to the sitcom’s diverting nature, in stark contrast to today’s broader, more physically-oriented comedies that crank up the volume of laughter bursts to 11 without an ounce of sincerity.

Those who only enjoy TV shows that deliver the kind of extreme hilarity that can produce tears probably won’t take to “Sabrina”, but the rest of us can find plenty to appreciate in the series. The modestly-budgeted but sufficient visual trickery employed to convey magic holds up quite well ten years later. The scripts contain a level of intelligence not often found among present-day’s primetime fare.

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The series embraces its sitcom nature, acknowledging the everything-resolved-in-22-minutes structure but packing in a lot of story and merriment. There’s also an impressive roster of guest stars — famous TV veterans, comedians, musicians, and other celebrities — that is put to good use in nearly every episode. Some of the bigger names that claim roles in Season 2 are Teri Garr, John Ratzenberger, Shelley Long, Tom Poston, Fred Willard, and Donald Faison. Those appearing as themselves (or something like that) — which in Season 2 includes Erik Estrada, Davy Jones, Bob Vila, Drew Carey, Johnny Mathis, the Backstreet Boys, and 10,000 Maniacs — are obviously very good sports and have fun playing with their public image.

The series embraces its sitcom nature, acknowledging the everything-resolved-in-22-minutes structure but packing in a lot of story and merriment. There’s also an impressive roster of guest stars — famous TV veterans, comedians, musicians, and other celebrities — that is put to good use in nearly every episode. Some of the bigger names that claim roles in Season 2 are Teri Garr, John Ratzenberger, Shelley Long, Tom Poston, Fred Willard, and Donald Faison. Those appearing as themselves (or something like that) — which in Season 2 includes Erik Estrada, Davy Jones, Bob Vila, Drew Carey, Johnny Mathis, the Backstreet Boys, and 10,000 Maniacs — are obviously very good sports and have fun playing with their public image.

Nearly five months after the show made its DVD debut, “Sabrina, The Teenage Witch” returned to the format in Paramount’s The Second Season release. The lack of a “Complete” in the moniker isn’t merely a stylistic choice. Though the package at least makes it clear, this 4-disc set is marred by a few scene cuts and a substantial number of pop song replacements. Viewers are asked to bid farewell to some of the hit ’90s songs that featured into “Sabrina”‘s soundtracks, such as Chumbawumba’s “Tubthumping”, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones’ “The Impression That I Get”, Savage Garden’s “Truly Madly Deeply”, OMC’s “How Bizarre”, and Third Eye Blind’s “Semi-Charmed Life.” Also ousted are Canned Heat’s “Goin’ Up the Country”, Henry Mancini’s Pink Panther theme, Belle and Sebastian’s “The State I Am In”, and Salem singing the ’60s “Wild Thing.” At least most “live” performances are left intact, preserving songs from 10,000 Maniacs (“Rainy Days”), Backstreet Boys (“I Want it That Way”), and even Sabrina’s quickly-formed Entry Number Five (who cover Blondie’s “One Way or Another”). One exception is the Christmas episode “Sabrina Claus”, which retains the audio excerpt and brief performance of Johnny Mathis’ “O Holy Night”, but drops his “Winter Wonderland” from a central montage, even cutting his singing bedroom cameo.

Music nearly registers as a character on the show and the late-’90s setting of the series is considerably diminished by losing almost all of the pop tunes sampled. The series’ typically salient montages are rendered far less memorable with the generic substitutions they are given. It’s unclear who to get annoyed at for the edits: can one blame Paramount for being stingy or should one direct their irritation at the music studios, who often with no knowledge by the artist, demand additional fees for DVDs even if, well-married to a scene, the exposure is greatly to their benefit? I suppose many will argue that this is preferable to the route Paramount has taken for Melissa Joan Hart’s pre-Sabrina Nickelodeon show “Clarissa Explains It All”, which has been indefinitely shelved after just one season’s release. But for anyone who remembers the original song selections, the edits are a severe disappointment. And they don’t even allow “Sabrina” to reach stores at the types of low prices other studios are now treating catalog TV series DVDs to; Season 2 arrives with an SRP that’s $9-$15 higher than other recently-released ’90s sitcom sets that haven’t been subjected to such cuts.

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A star () denotes my ten favorite episodes from the season. A pair of scissors () indicates that at least one scene from the episode is missing.

Disc 1

1. Sabrina Gets Her License, Part 1 (21:41) (Originally aired September 26, 1997)
Life as a newly-turned 17-year-old is busy for Sabrina, as she juggles classes, the school newspaper, showing new girl Valerie the ropes, and spending time with Harvey, all the while not devoting enough time to studying her handbook for her impending witch’s license test. Hilda and Zelda disagree over how to spend their bountifully-matured, centuries-old savings bond.

2. Sabrina Gets Her License, Part 2 (20:59) (Originally aired September 26, 1997)
Sabrina must attend witch camp, which is a lot like a military boot camp, only with the focus on the finger. She sneaks out to accompany Harvey at a school dance. Meanwhile, Zelda buys a lab-top with the bond money. (Note: Though this episode runs shorter than the others, it sounds like all it may be missing is the opening recap of Part 1 added for syndication.)

3. Dummy For Love (21:42) (Originally aired October 3, 1997)
Sabrina enlists Cupid (Patrick Thomas O’Brien) to bring Valerie close to a guy she’s interested in and a dummy spell to get Hilda on a date with the enamored Mr. Kraft. With football practice demanding too much of Harvey’s time, Sabrina’s editorial on school sports causes a row.

4. Dante’s Inferno (21:42) (Originally aired October 10, 1997)
Encouraged by their families to date other people, Sabrina goes out with new-to-the-Mortal-Realm Dante (Free Willy’s Jason James Richter) and Harvey hits it off with a model (Sarah Lancaster, “Saved By The Bell: The New Class”). Hilda is struck by punnitis. Also appearing in this star-studded episode are The Monkees’ Davy Jones (as himself) and Teri Garr.

5. A Doll’s Story (21:42) (Originally aired October 17, 1997)
Sabrina has her hands full babysitting her cousin Amanda (Melissa Joan Hart’s younger sister Emily, in a recurring role), who shrinks her into a doll and locks her into a toy box with similarly-transformed tiny folks (played by Paul Dooley, Donna D’Errico, and Paul Sand). Bickering Zelda and Hilda try to enjoy time apart at the same spa, to no avail.

6. Sabrina, The Teenage Boy (21:42) (Originally aired October 24, 1997)
Yearning to know what guys talk about when they’re alone, Sabrina has Hilda put a spell on her to look like a boy. As new guy at school Jack Spratsky, though, she finds herself in a love triangle with Valerie and Harvey. Hilda also uses the boy spell on herself to scare off a persistent Mr. Kraft.

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